Historic Ashtabula Photos

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Pump House Photo Close Up
Pump House Photo Close Up

This building located in the gorge near the river along side of the bridge was the pump house. It was here that victims of the disaster we taken to keep warm and out of the snow storm.

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Residents of Dr. Eames
Residents of Dr. Eames

Residents was located on Park St. in Ashtabula, OH.

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H.L. Morrison's & Sons
H.L. Morrison's & Sons

This store was owned by Henry L. Morrison. It was the largest store in the country and there were no larger stores in the area until you reached Cleveland. To learn more about Henry Morrision, go to the "Character" page under the "The Story / About" menu and click on his picture.

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Tombes Grocery Store
Tombes Grocery Store

Tombes Grocery Store at the corner of Main Ave. and Progress St. Note the oyster pails on the sidewalk. At left is the first bootblack stand in Ashtabula. (This photo was taken about 1895)

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Edwin Harmon Home
Edwin Harmon Home

This was the home of Edwin Harmon. Edwin was the father of Mary Collins, wife of Charles Collins. Mary and Charles would visit here often and Mary would stay here when her husband was away for long periods of time working as the LS & MS railroads chief engineer. Could this be Mary Collins standing on the front porch?

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Downtown Ashtabula
Downtown Ashtabula
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Winter in Ashtabula
Winter in Ashtabula
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Main Ave. Ashtabula
Main Ave. Ashtabula

This is Main Ave. looking south down the street in the winter.

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West Side of Main Ave.
West Side of Main Ave.

West side of Main Ave. North from Fisk House.

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Ashtabula House Hotel
Ashtabula House Hotel

The Ashtabula House hotel was one of the locations people from the disaster were taken. With no hospital in town, people were taken to homes and businesses to be treated and cared for.

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Ducro Block at Center & Main
Ducro Block at Center & Main

To the left is the business of John Ducro, cabinetmaker and undertaker. John Ducro helped to identify many of the dead from the disaster. This photo is of Centre St. looking from Main Street in Ashtabula, OH.

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Old Academy Bldg.
Old Academy Bldg.

This is the old Academy Bldg. moved from Park Ave. to Main Ave. It was the site of the Carlisle-Allen Store and the Masonic Lodge met here a few times. This building was build around 1851-1852.

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St. Peters Episcopal Church
St. Peters Episcopal Church

This is the inside of the Old St. Peters Episcopal Church. This was the church where one of two funeral services were held for the unrecognized dead of the disaster.

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St. Peters Episcopal Church
St. Peters Episcopal Church

This is how St. Peters Episcopal Church looked at the time of the disaster. It was completed on Feb. 22, 1829. A newer St. Peters Episcopal Church now stands at the same location in Ashtabula, Ohio.

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First St. Peters Episcopal Church
First St. Peters Episcopal Church

Photo of First St. Peters Episcopal Church before it was raised and replaced by a new church building, which stands today.

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Old Saloon
Old Saloon

In this photo of a saloon in Ashtabula. You will see James Manning (Pump House Engineer) standing to the far left. James Manning lost both his legs in a childhood dare attempting to jump onto a moving train. He almost died from his injures, but was saved by a doctor in town. He later made his own set of wooden legs so he could walk and work. There was no such thing as Social Security Disability in those days, so you worked, had family take care of you or starved.

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Ashtabula Hospital
Ashtabula Hospital

This is the first substantial hospital building that was built after the Ashtabula Disaster. There was a smaller building with only four beds before this one, so this building was very welcomed in Ashtabula after it was built.

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